CKCC-DANS


index

certainty

certainty; preferred name
certainty; Source: CMDI, TEI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5292

Identifier: certaintyTEI   Type: complex/open   Origin: TEI/CMDI   Profile: Metadata

Definition: The degree of certainty that applies to another metadata field. Which field, is specified by the context. The value domain is specified by the context as well.
Source: CMDI

Example: high medium low unknown
Source:

Explanation: A value of this category says something about other metadata. When used in a CMDI component, the specification of that component must make clear to which metadata in that component the given value applies. The CMDI context will also make clear which values are used to express certainty. Recommended choice: TEI: "Certainty may be expressed by one of the predefined symbolic values high, medium, or low. The value unknown should be used in cases where the encoder does not wish to assert an opinion about the matter."
Source:

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5292 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: string


district name

district name; standardized name
province name; admitted name
districtName; Source: CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5581

Identifier: districtName   Type: complex/open   Origin: CKCC   Profile: Metadata

Definition: The name of an administrative or geographical unit between (not including) the levels of cities and countries.
Source: Dirk Roorda

Example: Buckinghamshire, Noord-Holland, Ontario, New Mexico, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Source: Dirk Roorda

Explanation: Referring to places by names is an efficient way to link information together. It is not as precise as geographical coordinates, but in many cases the added precision of coordinates is not possible and not even wanted.
Source: Dirk Roorda

Note: Nowadays there are resources like Geonames that list most geographical names and link them to geographical coordinates. Yet we do not constrain the admitted placeNames to any such registry, because it should also be possible to specify historical place names, and place names that have no known designation.

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5581 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: string


geoLatitude

geoLatitude; standardized name
latitude; admitted name
geoLatitude; Source: CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5582

Identifier: geoLatitude   Type: complex/constrained   Origin: CKCC   Profile: Metadata

Definition: In geography, latitude is a geographic coordinate that specifies the north-south position of a point on the Earth's surface.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latitude

Example: The latitude of Amsterdam is 52.374 degrees, that of Sydney is 33.8683 degrees.
Source: Google

Example: Lines of constant latitude, or parallels, run east–west as circles parallel to the equator. Latitude is an angle which ranges from 0° at the Equator to 90° (North or South) at the poles.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latitude

Explanation: The World Geodetic System is a standard for use in cartography, geodesy, and navigation. It comprises a standard coordinate frame for the Earth, a standard spheroidal reference surface (the datum or reference ellipsoid) for raw altitude data, and a gravitational equipotential surface (the geoid) that defines the nominal sea level. The latest revision is WGS 84 (dating from 1984 and last revised in 2004), which was valid up to about 2010.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Geodetic_System

Explanation: The unit of latitude is the degree, expressed as a decimal number between -90 and +90. Latitude 0 is the equator, -90 is the South Pole, +90 is the North Pole. Degrees are subdivided as decimal degrees. In this datacategory there is no such thing as minutes and seconds as subdivisions of degrees. One degree latitude is a fixed distance. The sixtieth part of it (that would be one minute if we had allowed minutes as subdivisions of degrees) corresponds to one nautical mile or 1852m.
Source: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/WGS_84, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_degrees

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5582 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: decimal

Type: XML Schema facet
Rule: <xs:minInclusive value"-90"></xs:minInclusive value"-90">
Rule: <xs:maxInclusive value"90"></xs:maxInclusive value"90">


geoLongitude

geoLongitude; standardized name
longitude; admitted name
geoLongitude; Source: CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5583

Identifier: geoLongitude   Type: complex/constrained   Origin: CKCC   Profile: Metadata

Definition: Longitude is a geographic coordinate that specifies the east-west position of a point on the Earth's surface.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longitude

Example: The longitude of Amsterdam is 4.891 degrees, that of Reykjavik is -21.9333 degrees.
Source: Google

Example: The longitude of Saõ Paulo is -46.619 degrees.
Source:

Explanation: The World Geodetic System is a standard for use in cartography, geodesy, and navigation. It comprises a standard coordinate frame for the Earth, a standard spheroidal reference surface (the datum or reference ellipsoid) for raw altitude data, and a gravitational equipotential surface (the geoid) that defines the nominal sea level. The latest revision is WGS 84 (dating from 1984 and last revised in 2004), which was valid up to about 2010.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Geodetic_System

Explanation: The unit of longitude is the degree expressed as a decimal number between -180 and +180. Longitude 0 is the "Greenwich meridian", a half great-circle that runs through Greenwich in London, UK. The precise location is specified in WGS84 and its updates. Degrees are subdivided as decimal degrees. In this datacategory there is no such thing as minutes and seconds as subdivisions of degrees. Negative longitudes are western latitudes, positive longitudes are eastern latitudes. The values -180 and +180 denote the same longitude. The degree longitude is not a fixed distance, it is nearly zero near the poles, and it has maximum value near the equator.
Source: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/WGS_84, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_degrees

Explanation: Points with the same longitude lie in lines running from the North Pole to the South Pole.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longitude

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5583 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: decimal

Type: XML Schema facet
Rule: <xs:maxInclusive value"180"></xs:maxInclusive value"180">
Rule: <xs:minInclusive value"-180"></xs:minInclusive value"-180">


historical date

historical date; preferred name
historicalDate; Source: CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5291

Identifier: historicalDate   Type: complex/constrained   Origin:    Profile: Metadata

Definition: Specification of a historical point in time, with a precision of year or month or day.
Source: Dirk Roorda

Example: 1672 1672-06 1672-06-23
Source:

Explanation: 1672 is the year 1672. When this historical date is the predicate of an event, it means that the event happened in that year. When it is the predicate of an object, it means that the object existed in that year. Other predicates may indicate that the value refers to the start or and of existence or activity. For example, dateBirth=1672, dateDeath=1732 means that the person in question started living somewhere in 1672 and stopped living somewhere in 1732. Analogously for assertions minDate=1672-06-23, maxDate=1732-01. The phenomenon in question did certainly not occur before the day 1672-06-23, and was not seen after the month 1732-01.
Source:

Explanation: Where as ISO 8601 has date and datetime types, there is no type with a variable precision between year and month. This data type conforms to ISO 8601 date type in all details except for this relaxation: the day part is optional, and the month part is optional, provided that when the month part is missing, the day part is also missing. Historical points in time are not objective timestamps, but specifications of chunks of time in which something happened or in which something or somebody existed. The specification of the value resembles the current knowledge or the desired precision by which the time coordinate may be expressed.
Source:

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5291 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: string

Type: XML Schema regular expression
Rule: [0-9]{4}(-[01][0-9](-[0123][0-9])?)?


historical location

historical location; standardized name
historical place; admitted name
historical location; Source: CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5584

Identifier: historicalLocation   Type: container   Origin: CKCC   Profile: Metadata

Definition: Specification of a historical place on earth either by names of town, district and country, or by geographical coordinates, or by any combination of these. It invokes the categories placeName, districtName, country, geoLatitude and geoLongitude to specify these parts.
Source: Dirk Roorda

Example: See the categories for the components.
Source: Dirk Roorda

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5584 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


last name proper

last name proper; standardized name
family name proper; admitted name
lastNameProper; Source: CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5579

Identifier: lastNameProper   Type: complex/open   Origin: CMDI   Profile: Metadata

Definition: Part of a person's lastName that remains when stripping the lastNamePrefix from it. See the definition of lastNamePrefix.
Source: Dirk Roorda

Example: In "Henk van den Berg", "Henk" is firstName, "van den Berg" is lastName, "van den" is lastNamePrefix, and "Berg" is lastNameProper
Source: Dirk Roorda

Note: In the Netherlands lastNames are sorted on lastNameProper. See also the explanations for lastNamePrefix.

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5579 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: string


lastNamePrefix

lastNamePrefix; standardized name
tussenvoegsel; admitted name
familyNamePrefix; admitted name
lastNamePrefix; Source: CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5578

Identifier: lastNamePrefix   Type: complex/open   Origin: CMDI   Profile: Metadata

Definition: A tussenvoegsel (pronounced [ˈtʏsənˌvuxsəl]) in Dutch linguistics is a word that is positioned between a person's first and last name.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tussenvoegsel

Example: The most common tussenvoegsels are "van" (as in Dick van Dyke) meaning "from" and "de" (as in Greg de Vries), meaning "the". Most Dutch surnames include no tussenvoegsel (as in Mark Rutte and Wim Kok).
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tussenvoegsel

Example: Common tussenvoegsels[2] aan (at) bij (near) de (the, but "de" can also be French and Spanish for "of".) den, der, d' (of the) het, 't (the) in (in) onder (under, below) op (on, at) over (over, beyond) 's (of the) te, ten, ter (of) tot (till) uit, uijt (from, out of) van, van den, van der (of, of the, of the), e.g. Van Dijk, Van der Geest (from / from the) voor (to)
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tussenvoegsel

Example: Combinations of these words are also common. For example: aan de, aan den, aan der, aan het, aan 't bij de, bij den, bij het, bij 't boven d' in de, in den, in der, in het, in 't onder de, onder den, onder het, onder 't over de, over den, over het, over 't op de, op den, op der, op het, op 't, op ten van de, van den, van der, van het, van 't, van ter uit de, uit den, uit het, uit 't, uit ten uijt de, uijt den, uijt het, uijt 't, uijt ten (The uij spelling is Old Dutch) ver (a contraction of van der) voor de, voor den, voor in 't
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tussenvoegsel

Explanation: The use of tussenvoegsels differs between the Netherlands and Belgium. In the Netherlands, these tussenvoegsels are not included when sorting alphabetically. For example, in the Dutch telephone directory the surname "De Vries" is listed under "V", not "D". Therefore in Dutch databases tussenvoegsels are recorded separately. This often simplifies finding a Dutch surname in a Dutch database, because including the tussenvoegsel would result in many surnames being listed under "D" and "V". According to Dutch language rules in the Netherlands, the tussenvoegsel in a surname is written with a capital letter only when it starts a sentence or is not preceded by a first name or initial. So referring to a Peter whose surname is "De Vries" we write "meneer De Vries" (Mr De Vries), but "Peter de Vries" and "P. de Vries". In Belgium (as Francophone surnames rarely have tussenvoegsels) surnames are collated with the full surname including tussenvoegsels. "De Smet" comes before "Dossche" in a telephone book. In contrast to Dutch orthographic rules, in Belgium tussenvoegsels always keep their original orthography, as in meneer Van Der Velde, meneer P. Van Der Velde or Peter Van Der Velde.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tussenvoegsel

Note: When a last name is split up in a lastNamePrefix and a remaining part, use lastNameProper for that remaining part. Hence lastNamePrefix concatenated with lastNameProper equals lastName.

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5578 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: string


place name

place name; standardized name
placeName; Source: CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5580

Identifier: placeName   Type: complex/open   Origin: CKCC   Profile: Metadata

Definition: The name of an administrative or geographical unit at the level of villages, towns and cities.
Source: Dirk Roorda

Example: Amsterdam, Greenwich, New York, Potsdam
Source: Dirk Roorda

Explanation: Referring to places by names is an efficient way to link information together. It is not as precise as geographical coordinates, but in many cases the added precision of coordinates is not possible and not even wanted.
Source:

Note: Nowadays there are resources like Geonames that list most geographical names and link them to geographical coordinates. Yet we do not constrain the admitted placeNames to any such registry, because it should also be possible to specify historical place names, and place names that have no known designation.

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5580 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: string


responsibility

responsibility; preferred name
responsibility; Source: TEI/CMDI; data element name

PID: http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5293

Identifier: responsibilityTEI   Type: complex/open   Origin: TEI/CMDI   Profile: Metadata

Definition: The responsibility that applies to another metadata field. Which field, is specified by the context. The value domain is specified by the context as well. TEI: this value indicates "who is responsible for something asserted by the markup and the degree of certainty associated with it."
Source: TEI/CMDI

Example: source editor A. Milhaud
Source:

Explanation: The value may indicate a person, but also an object, a product, an activity or a situation. For example, if a value is inferred by reasoning, the responsibility might be indicated by "interpretation". If a value is evident from the source, the value might be "source". If a value comes from related sources, the value might be "circumstantial".
Source:

License: This work by http://www.datcatinfo.net/datcat/DC-5293 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Data type: string


Nametype
1certaintycomplex/open
2district namecomplex/open
3geoLatitudecomplex/constrained
4geoLongitudecomplex/constrained
5historical datecomplex/constrained
6historical locationcontainer
7last name propercomplex/open
8lastNamePrefixcomplex/open
9place namecomplex/open
10responsibilitycomplex/open